eLetters

677 e-Letters

  • Re: Dexamethasone treatment and cerebral palsy
    Eric S Shinwell
    Dear Editor,

    We appreciate Dr Pharoah's comments on the definitions of incidence and prevalence.[1] However, his interpretation of the data appears erroneous.[2]

    Dr Pharoah suggests that perhaps the dexamethasone-treated infants were sicker than the control infants and were saved by the intervention only to go on to suffer from cerebral palsy. This interpretation is incompatible with the data. There were...

    Show More
  • "Post discharge" formula consumption in pre-term infants
    Alan Lucas
    Dear Editor:

    In view of the increasing interest in the special nutritional care of nutritionally-compromised infants, we should like to identify an incorrect description of our work on the subject. In their Current Topic article on Feeding issues in preterm infants, Cooke and Embleton[1] cited our randomised trial[2] showing faster linear growth and weight gain in post-discharged preterm infants assigned to a specially...

    Show More
  • Vulnerability by sex and evolutionary theory
    Jonathan Wells

    Dear Editor,

    In a recent article Stevenson and colleagues[1] report further data showing increased vulnerability of male compared to female infants in early life, and comment that the biological mechanisms contributing to the male disadvantage or female advantage have not been elucidated.

    In fact, male vulnerability in early life is consistent with an aspect of evolutionary theory described by Trivers...

    Show More
  • Twin to twin transfusion syndrome.
    THHG Koh
    Dear Editor,

    The three excellent articles on twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) provide futher important data for clinical decisions and parental counselling. We would like to comment on the paper by Cincotta et al.[1]

    We are interested in the incidence of hydrops and absence of end diastolic velocity of the umbilical artery in the cohort and their correlation with outcome. A recent study of 33 pregn...

    Show More
  • Dexamethasone treatment and cerebral palsy
    POD Pharoah
    Dear Editor,

    Both the title of this paper and the first paragraph of the discussion imply that the use of postnatal dexamethasone may lead to cerebral palsy. However, it is the misuse of the term "incidence" that gives rise to this interpretation. The authors did not, neither could they, provide incidence data. What they presented was cerebral palsy prevalence data.

    If it is accepted that prevalence and no...

    Show More
  • Re: ROP could contribute to defects in eye-hand coordination
    Miriam Katz-Salamon

    Dear Editor:

    We are grateful for the response to our article on the neurodevelopment of infants with CLD. The comment as to the possible contribution of ROP to deficient eye-hand coordination is supported by the Swedish study published in British Journal of Ophthalmology (1991;75;527-31). The study clearly showed higher prevalence of ocular abnormalities in children with a birth weight below 1000 g and gesta...

    Show More
  • Premedication of neonates revisited
    Sanjay Gupta

    Dear Editor:

    A recent advance in premedicating infants requiring intubation has gained wide acceptance for humanitarian and physiological reasons.[1] The use of muscle relaxation to facilitate intubation is quite separate from sedation providing analgesia, amnesia and lack of awareness.

    Practice is variable with little evidence-based guidance to suitable drugs. Clinical Governance dictates continuing a...

    Show More
  • Reducing the burden of neonatal sepsis
    Khalid Haque

    Dear Editor:

    In their review on reducing the burden of neonatal sepsis[1] Modi and Carr discuss at length the role of colony stimulating factors (CSFs) in neonatal sepsis.

    The evidence thus far does not show either a reduction in incidence or mortality from neonatal sepsis when this modality is used albeit possibly in a small group of small for gestational age babies or babies who develop neutropenia s...

    Show More
  • ROP could contribute to defects in eye-hand coordination
    Rajalakshmi Lakshman
    Dear Editor:

    Katz-Salamon et al[1] make the important point that children with chronic lung disease (CLD) need careful neurodevelopmental follow up irrespective of whether or not they suffered from intraventricular haemmorhage or periventricular leucomalacia.

    Visual dysfunction due to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) could contribute to defects in control of hand and eye coordination.

    It would be in...

    Show More
  • Confirmed GBS infection - the tip of the iceberg
    AR Bedford Russell

    Dear Editor:

    Beardsall et al are to be congratulated on presenting further evidence that group B streptococcus (GBS) gives rise to a significant burden of disease in some areas of the United Kingdom.[1] Retrospective data collected at St George’s is in agreement with the authors’ suggestion that culture proven sepsis under-represents the true burden of disease.

    Firstly we conducted a retrospective search...

    Show More

Pages