eLetters

700 e-Letters

  • Neonatal paroxetine withdrawal syndrome or actually serotonin syndrome?
    Geoffrey K Isbister
    Dear Editor

    We would like to comment on the article “Neonatal paroxetine withdrawal syndrome” in the March 2001 issue of the journal.[1] The authors describe what they have called “neonatal paroxetine withdrawal syndrome”. However the syndrome reported in the 4 neonates appears to be more consistent with serotonin toxicity, rather than withdrawal of paroxetine.

    The literature to date contains one large serie...

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  • Oxygen saturation and retinopathy of prematurity
    Rob Primhak
    Dear Editor,

    The observations of Tin et al have led them to suggest that babies may have better overall outcomes when unit policies aim at oxygen levels of 70-90%, much lower than current practice in most NICUs. While I would support their call for further well-designed research into this question, I have major concerns that this concept of beneficial hypoxia might creep into clinical practice, and even be extended to...

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  • Two sacred cows of neonatal intensive care
    NRC Roberton
    Dear Editor,

    I read the descriptive study of Tin at al[1] with considerable interest. In essence it challenges two sacred cows of neonatal intensive care, whether intra-arterial monitoring is necessary, and what is the appropriate PaO2 at which to nurse critically ill babies.

    Arterial Monitoring
    They do not give us accurate details of arterial catheter use. There is a hint that they are used...

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  • Translational regulation of TfR and ferritin - Authors' response
    Henry L Halliday
    Dear Editor

    We thank Peter Reynolds for his continuing interest in our recent article.[1] In his first letter[2] he made a number of interesting points to which we responded.[3] He has now clarified[4] a point raised in his first letter. This turns out to be our inadvertent use of the word "transcription" when we meant "translation" in the discussion section of our original paper.[1] We apologise for this oversig...

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  • Neonatal meningitis
    H D Dellagrammaticas
    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the study by Holt et al,[1] which provides very useful data regarding the current status of neonatal meningitis in England and Wales, where it appears that the incidence of the disease has remained practically unchanged. In a retrospective study of 72 cases of Gram negative bacterial meninitis (GNBM) in term neonates from a single centre in Greece, covering a 15-year period,[2] we too did no...

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  • Beliefs versus facts
    John Dalton
    Dear Editor

    Those who believe that urine stained clothes will diminish the power of prayer and that circumcision will prevent such staining, are entitled to their opinion. The assertions that male circumcision decreases the incidence of cancer of the penis cannot however go unchallenged.

    It is quite clear that circumcision does not prevent cancer of the penis.[1-...

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  • Practical management of hyperinsulinism in infancy
    N Mehta

    Dear Editor,

    We enjoyed the article on practical management of hyperinsulinism by Aynsley-Green et al.[1] The article re-emphasises the importance of accurate measurement of blood glucose and insists on an accurate laboratory method and not a bedside screening test for diagnosing hypoglycaemia. In certain situations, the use of a bed-side test will be unavoidable, eg, if there will be a long delay before a l...

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  • Chasing spurious hyponatraemia
    Sanjay Patole
    Dear Editor

    The need for a conservative approach to hyponatraemia in preterm neonates was emphasised in a recent issue.[1] It was interesting to note that chasing hyponatraemia (serum sodium: 124 mmol/l) during hyperglycemia requiring insulin infusion in a 1060g neonate was associated with fluid retention and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The maximum serum sodium levels achieved were 136 mmol/l (Maximum sodium supplemen...

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  • Large for gestational age infants and haemotological indices: is leptin responsible?
    Didem Aliefendioglu
    Dear Editor,

    We were interested to read the article of Dollberg et al[1] about the haematological indices in large for gestational age (LGA) infants. In the mentioned article the absolute normoblast count, packed cell volume, and corrected white blood cell count were found to be significantly higher in the LGA infants.

    Leptin, a recently discovered protein hormone, encoded by the ob gene, has been shown to be...

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  • Translational regulation of TfR and ferritin
    Peter Reynolds
    Dear Editor,

    I thank Professors Halliday and Lappin for their riposte.[1] They suggest that I wish to describe the control of intracellular iron as "post-translational". That is an incorrect reading of my earlier response, where I described the control as "translational".[2]

    In their original article (and I quote) "Simultaneously, in a highly coordinated process IRPs bind to the 5' end of the ferritin gene an...

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