eLetters

677 e-Letters

  • Muslim birth customs
    Rihab Tawfik
    Dear Editor,

    This article on Muslim birth customs[1] makes good and very useful reading not only to non-Muslim professionals who work with children but also to Muslims, like me, who are not familiar with these practices which are seen basically in Muslims from the Indian subcontinent and are, many times, cultural rather than based on clear religious directions.

    Many of these practices are not known to Muslim Ar...

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  • Newborns have unique confounding factors regarding the TfR-F ratio
    Peter Reynolds
    Dear Editor,

    Sweet et al investigated the serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) and, for the first time in neonates, transferrin receptor-log ferritin (TfR-F) ratio in a prospective series of cord blood taken from term infants and their mothers. They are to be congratulated on completing another piece of the complex jigsaw that is fetal and neonatal iron metabolism.

    sTfR and TfR-F were increased in iron deficient m...

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  • Honey in neonates
    Julia Clark
    Dear Editor

    This was an interesting and useful article on birth customs from a religion and culture dfferent from my own, and should be compulsory reading for those invloved in obstetrics and neonates.

    There is, however, one practice which I would like to comment on. The use of honey in young children (under 6 months) is not usually recommended because of the (rare) risk of botulism. Honey is the one dietary re...

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  • The Pakistani Parent and Cerebral Palsy News
    Naseeruddin Mahmood
    Dear Editor:

    I agree with Professor Marlow.

    We at our unit in Karachi deal with a spectrum of parents ranging from the highly educated cosmopolitan couple to the the very illiterate labobourer family on the verge of poverty.Our practice has been to address the risk of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome right from day 1, based on the prematurity.During subsequent discussions the range of such disability gets...

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  • Response to Dr Srinivasan
    A Jain
    Dear Editor:

    We thank Dr Srinivasan for his interest in our paper. For clarity, some of the original results were not included in the published paper. In response to his points:

    To be clinically effective, a topical local anaesthetic agent should work in almost all cases. Whether the sample size was 20 or 100 seems less relevant. However, we considered that to be clinically effective, the proportion of newbo...

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  • Early mucosal immunocompetence in infancy
    BM Seidel

    Dear Editor,

    The study of Groenland et al contributes remarkably to the understanding of the role of intenstinal colonisation and the maturation of the mucosal immune system.

    However, with reference to reports of MacDonald,[1] Savilahti,[2] and Burgio et al,[3] they suggest that the mucosal immune system with its predominant secretory IgA is quantitatively and functionally defective for a variable peri...

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  • Balanced anaesthesia is the key to successful neonatal intubation
    Stephen W Hancock
    Dear Editor,

    Premedication for neonatal intubation has become a hot topic recently, and in their letter Attardi et al[1] make an interesting contribution to the debate. However the significant increase in oxyhaemaglobin desaturation in those neonates intubated following administration of midazolam when compared to placebo is not surprising.

    Midazolam is a hypnotic agent and as such can only be useful as part of...

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  • Has ametop come to stay?
    R Srinivasan
    Dear Editor,

    The authors of this paper need all appreciation in trying out this “magic cream” on babies, which already finds an established role in children as a topical anaesthetic.

    However as one goes through this interesting article, a striking feature is the small numbers in the study. I find no mention as regards to the power of the study. The confidence limits while expressing significant p values is...

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  • Measurement of methaemoglobin levels in babies
    Ruth Taylor
    Dear Editor,

    Nitric oxide (NO) is frequently used as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in neonates. Since its metabolite, methaemoglobin can potentially cause tissue hypoxia it is considered mandatory to measure methaemoglobin levels when using NO. In an attempt to review and rationalise our own practice of methaemoglobin measurement when using NO we undertook a search of current literature and conducted a postal surv...

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  • Single versus multiple courses of antenatal steroids - uncertainty remains
    Simon Gates
    Dear Editor,

    Whitelaw and Thoresen recently reviewed the current evidence concerning the effects of antenatal steroids on brain development, and made suggestions for clinical practice.

    We believe that interpretation of current evidence is not yet clear enough to determine clinical practice, and further research is necessary before such recommendations are possible. No randomised controlled trials comparing si...

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