eLetters

462 e-Letters

published between 2013 and 2016

  • Benzyl alcohol
    Pradeep Alur

    Dear editor

    It was interesting to read the case report on Clindamycin associated adverse reaction.

    Though Benzyl alcohol containing fluids should be avoided for possible association with IVH and kernicterus. One may be surprised to learn that Vitamin K that is commonly used in every newborn has 9 mgs of benzyl alcohol. Quite a few commonly used medications such as pancuronium bromide, aminophylline, lorazep...

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  • Complication rates
    Matthew Babirecki

    Dear Editor,

    I found this article interesting but found the data presented in Table 2 regarding complication rates to be confusing. An n value of 30 is given for the conservative treatment group. However only 10 babies were "treated" for their PDA, 20 babies did not have a PDA. Therefore is it correct to compare percentage rates with studies of babies who did have a PDA?

    2% of this group had a grade 3 IV...

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  • Re: Inadvertent overdosing of neonates
    Anjali S. Bangalore

    Dear Editor,

    I agree with you that there can be overdosage while administrating IV medications in neonates. These are few of the precautions we take in our neonatal unit to avoid medication errors.

    1. The required quantity of diluent is first drawn in the syringe and then the required amount of the drug is drawn in the syringe and quantity measured in the middle part of the syringe.

    2. Required qua...

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  • Sources of 8-OHdG in VLBW infants
    Josephine A Drury

    Dear Editor

    We read the paper by Shoji et al.[1] with interest but would like to offer an alternative explanation for their findings. They observed lower 8-OHdG at 14 and 28 days in preterm infants fed with breast-milk as compared with formula. This replicates their previous findings with term infants and tested at 28 days.[2] The levels reported here are lower than those reported in their term infants, r...

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  • Variation in practice among paediatric consultants when referring unexpected neonatal deaths to coro
    Anil K Garg

    Dear Editor,

    Thank you to Dr Chonat and colleagues for looking at an important facet of neonatal care. We are concerned about the, frequently used term, in Case 2 “delivered …. after failed forceps”. This phrase could imply ‘incompetence’ on part of attending doctor. An alternative phrase “delivered …….after attempted forceps” implies that all babies cannot always be delivered by ‘forceps’ and does not cast doubt o...

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  • Preventing Neonatal Transfusion
    George M. Morley

    Dear Editor

    For obstetricians and midwives, preventing (sometimes massive) blood loss and thus avoiding maternal transfusion are basic principles of practice. Therefore, the introductory statement in this article from Hammersmith Hospital is quite astounding:

    “Sick neonates are one of the most heavily transfused groups of patients in modern medicine.”

    The authors do not attempt to explain or pre...

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  • Adjustment of ventilation for treatment of patent ductus arteriosus
    Bai-Horng Su

    Dear Editor,

    An interesting aspect is that the combination of adjustment of ventilation and fluid restriction achieved an overall ductal closure rate of 100%. There is no evidence for any effect of differing ventilation modalities upon the incidence of PDA.

    Both inspiratory time and positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) can affect the mean airway pressure during mechanical ventilation. But mean airwa...

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  • Postnatal weight loss in term infants: what is "normal" and do growth charts allow for it?
    Peter D Macdonald

    Dear Editor,

    In their study Drs Wright and Parkinson report that breast fed infants showed less postnatal weight gain compared to formula-fed infants and were significantly more likely to lose more than 10% of their birth weight.[1] They comment that this trend was no longer significant after adjustment for birth weight, which was significantly higher in breast fed infants. I wonder if adjusting for birthweight is act...

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  • Micropremature Babies Need Special Component Parts for Their Total Parenteral Nutrition
    Dennis T Costakos, MD

    Dear Editor

    The paper by Ibrahim M et al.[1] puts forward the important concept that preterm infants, particularly babies very low birth weight babies, are in negative iodine balance on current standard regimens of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The resulting consequence is low postnatal serum iodothyroxine levels, and a greater risk of neurodevelopmental problems, including cerebral palsy.

    ...

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  • Not all osmolality is created equal
    Tanis R Fenton

    Dear Editor,

    The article “Increased osmolality of breast milk with therapeutic additives” by L Srinivasan et al. reports the osmolality of supplements, drugs and fortifiers to breastmilk for preterm infants based on the assumption that laboratory measured osmolality presents an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) for the preterm infant.[1] In the consideration of the association between hyperosmolar...

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