eLetters

228 e-Letters

published between 2002 and 2005

  • Borderline antenatal dilation of renal pelvis: not so benign after all?
    Mithilesh K Lal

    Dear Editor,

    I read plant et al’s short report ‘Does antenatal pelvic dilation predict renal scarring’ with interest.[1] They conclude that moderate renal pelvic dilation of 5-15 mm is not a marker for increased risk of urine infection or renal scarring, and suggest that it is inappropriate to perform cystograms on these babies.

    I want to bring to their attention 2 recent cases that we dealt with – bot...

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  • A physical manoeuvre?
    Al Kaliana

    Dear Editor,

    Simply 2 questions for 3 keywords.

    First, were there concurrent recordings of associative movements in the prone position? The prone position has been implicated as a risk factor for years yet research has been lying prone on it as a blanket description for just as long. Is it the prone position per se which is at risk? Or, could it be the base point from which a series of movements is initi...

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  • Single daily dose aminoglycosides in the neonatal period appear to be effective: but are they safe?
    Peter M Loughnan

    Dear Editor,

    A recent article by Nestaas et al.[1] deserves comment. This meta- analysis attempts to evaluate the relative efficacy and toxicity of “extended interval dosing” (EID), compared to “traditional dosing” (TD), of aminoglycosides administered to newborn infants. The conclusion of the analysis was that “extended interval dosing of aminoglycosides in neonates is safe and effective, with a reduced risk of se...

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  • Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensates from infants with RDS and the development of CLD
    Fook-Choe Cheah

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the review on exhaled breath measures of inflammation by Harrison et al.[1] We agree that there is a need to develop and standardise methods for the collection of exhaled breath markers as part of clinical monitoring of neonates on respiratory support. A major limitation we encountered with collecting exhaled breath condensates (EBC) using a method we published earlier was that hydr...

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  • Postnatal ultrasound - a minimum requirement for moderate antenatal renal pelvic dilatation
    Hassib Narchi

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the report by Plant et al.[1] , in which it is suggested that children with antenatal renal pelvic diameter of 5-15 mm do not require postnatal investigations or treatment as their rate of renal scarring with DMSA after the age of 4 years (1/189 children) was 0.5% (95% confidence interval 0 to 2.9) for both sexes combined. It is not clear however if their results represent antenatal...

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  • RSV and bronchiolitis
    Hans LA Van Rostenberghe

    Dear Editor,

    In the study by P Bala et al. [1] it seems that interpretations on cost effectiveness of Palivizumab are made based on the number of admissions for bronchiolitis alone.

    We conducted an epidemiological study to determine the importance of RSV in the region on 412 consecutive 1 month to 2 year old children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Kelantan, Malaysia, because of lower respiratory t...

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  • Double-lumen peripherally inserted central catheter: a new useful device for neonates
    Akihisa Nitta

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the publication of the audit on the use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) by D W Cartwright.

    A 25-gauge polyurethane double-lumen PICC (PI catheter Kit® double-lumen, Nippon Sherwood, Tokyo) is used in the neonatal intensive care unit since July 2001. The advantages include an insertion approach similar to that for single-lumen PICC insertion, simul...

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  • Asphyxia, or just hypoxia?
    Theo HM Fenton

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Stenson claims that Fugelseth et al's article [1] showed that "The use of 100% oxygen offered no benefit in terms of restoration of cardiac output or normalisation of pulmonary artery pressure after severe asphyxia". However, if we still take a-sphyxia to mean without-pulse, the pigs were not asphyxiated; they were just rendered hypoxic.

    Fugelseth et al. largely avoid the term asphyxia i...

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  • Use of chin straps to achieve active mouth closure in preterm neonates.
    Vijayakumar Praveen

    Dear Editor,

    I read with great interest the article "Pharyngeal pressure in preterm infants receiving nasal CPAP" by AG De Paoli et al. in the January 2005 issue of ADC Fetal and Neonatal edition. It is a well designed study assessing the transmission of applied CPAP to the upper airway by employing active mouth closure.

    In the study, active mouth closure was achieved by gentle pressure to the chin by...

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  • Randomised controlled trial of morphine vs. phenobarbitone for NAS: which treatment is better?
    KAPIL GARGH

    Dear Editor,

    We read the article by Jackson et al with interest [1]. Following points are noteworthy:

    Firstly, the two study groups were not compared in terms of severity of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome i.e. Lipitz scores. This may be significantly different in the two groups, making it difficult to assess the superiority of morphine over phenobarbitone [2]. Though the maternal methadone dose was compa...

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