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NeoBeat offers rapid newborn heart rate assessment
  1. Jessica Brittany Bush1,
  2. Victoria Cooley2,
  3. Jeffrey Perlman2,
  4. Catherine Chang2
  1. 1 Department of Pediatrics, New York Presbyterian Hospital – Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, USA
  2. 2 Department of Population Health Sciences, New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell, New York, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr. Jessica Brittany Bush, Pediatrics, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, USA; jeb9245{at}nyp.org

Abstract

Background Heart rate (HR) is used to guide interventions during delivery room (DR) neonatal resuscitation. Dry electrode ECG (NeoBeat) may detect HR more rapidly than pulse oximetry (PO) and portable ECG, but real-time comparisons of these devices are lacking.

Design/methods PO, ECG and NeoBeat were placed sequentially on newborns in the DR. Time for device placement and time to accurate HR acquisition were noted.

Results DR resuscitations of 28 preterm/term infants were observed. The NeoBeat was placed faster (ie, 3 s) than PO (20 s, p=<0.0001) and ECG (16 s, p=<0.0001). Total time from initiation of device placement to HR acquisition was fastest with NeoBeat (13 s) versus ECG (42 s, p<0.0001) and PO (105 s, p<0.0001) (duration values=median).

Conclusions These observations in a small cohort of relatively well neonates demonstrate that the NeoBeat is significantly faster to place and consistently acquires HR faster than PO and ECG.

  • resuscitation
  • neonatology

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JBB: conception of the work, acquisition and interpretation of data. CC and JP: conception of the work and interpretation of data. VC: analysis of the data.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests JP has previously received travel grants from Laerdal Global health to oversee Research in Tanzania.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval The institutional review board of Weill Cornell Medicine approved this study.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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