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T-piece resuscitators: What you set is often not what gets delivered or measured
  1. Murray Hinder1,2,
  2. Thomas Drevhammar3,
  3. Snorri Donaldsson3,
  4. Matthew Boustred4,
  5. Matthew Crott4,
  6. Mark Brian Tracy1,2
  1. 1 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3 Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  4. 4 School of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Murray Hinder, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia; murray.hinder{at}health.nsw.gov.au

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Thank you for the opportunity to respond to the comments by Hunt et al 1 on our paper.2 We do acknowledge that the presence of inertia in the fluid-filled lung can and does affect respiratory mechanics and that its contribution is very difficult to quantify and replicate in static test lung models. Though some modelling studies suggest inertance not to be of clinical significance in the low compliant moderate resistance infant lung.3 Both ETT size4 and placement of differential pressure pneumotachograph5 …

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  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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