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Incorporating dextrose gel and feeding in the treatment of neonatal hypoglycaemia
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  • Published on:
    Dr Ilana Levene

    Thank you for this interesting article, which really adds to our understanding of management of neonatal hypoglycaemia. However, your conclusion that a subset of babies should receive formula rather than breastfeed alongside gel, depending on their blood glucose level, is not supported by the evidence you have provided and ignores the potential harm associated with this approach.

    Your data states that alongside the first use of gel, breastfed babies are more likely to require a second gel. There is no literature to support the idea that experiencing a second transient hypoglycaemia in a carefully monitored baby in the first 48 hours of life is harmful (indeed UK guidance uses a treatment threshold of 2mmol/l for the entire first 48 hours of life), and alongside the second gel breastfeeding is as effective as formula so there is no reason to suppose from the data provided that breastfed babies are more likely to go on to require intravenous dextrose.

    Asking breastfeeding mothers to use formula instead of breastfeeding in the first hours of their baby's life is likely to undermine mothers' trust in breastfeeding, may impact on their milk supply through reduced stimulation in the critical time period and reduces the colostrum volume ingested, with its unique immune properties. It is not a recommendation to be made lightly.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.