Article Text

PDF
Letter
UK survey of less invasive surfactant administration
  1. Eleanor Jeffreys1,2,
  2. Katie Hunt1,2,
  3. Theodore Dassios2,3,
  4. Anne Greenough1,2
  1. 1Department of Women and Children’s Health, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Science and Medicine, King’s College London, London, UK
  2. 2MRC & Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma, King’s College London, London, UK
  3. 3Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Professor Anne Greenough, Department of Women and Children’s Health, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Science and Medicine, King’s College London, London SE5 9RS; anne.greenough{at}kcl.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Increasing use of non-invasive ventilation has led to the development of techniques which deliver surfactant without resort to intubation. These are called less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) or minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST). A systematic review of six randomised controlled trials demonstrated LISA use in infants with respiratory distress syndrome was associated with a reduced incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and death at 36 weeks and need for mechanical ventilation1; the latter was also reported in a further systematic review.2 A survey of LISA use across Europe demonstrated variation in practice.3 Only 12 UK units, however, were included hence we determined current practice regarding LISA in all levels of UK neonatal units. An online questionnaire was sent to all …

View Full Text

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.