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Fever in healthy asymptomatic newborns during the first days of life
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  • Published on:
    Dehydration: the main cause of fever during the first week of life
    • Filiz Tiker, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine
    • Other Contributors:
      • Berkan Gurakan, Hasan Kilicdag, and Aylin Tarcan

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the findings of Maayan-Metzger et al. relating fever in healthy newborns during the first days of life.[1]

    It is difficult to identify febrile neonates at low risk for serious bacterial infection.[2] Although, no consensus exists on the optimal approach to diagnosis and treatment, current guidelines recommend to admit all febrile infants less than 28 days of age to the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Fever in healthy asymptomatic newborns
    • Girish Gupta, Neonatologist
    • Other Contributors:
      • Suyal A, Nair MNG

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the article "Fever in healthy asymptomatic newborns during the first days of life" by Maayan-Metzger et al.[1]

    The article reinforced awareness about the occurrence of fever in term asymptomatic newborns during early neonatal life. It brought out association of risk factors viz. weight loss, exclusive breast feeding, Caesarean delivery & higher birth weight w...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's Reply

    Dear Editor

    We welcome the comment by Hassib Narchi on our paper.[1]

    We (and our statistical advisor) think we did analyze our data properly, but it is possible that methods description was lacking. Matching a control new born to each of the study babies was only for the purpose of creating a gestational age balanced control group. From that point on, we compared the statistics of the two groups rather than...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Fever must be differentiated from hyperthermia
    • A. Sahib M El-Radhi, Consultant Paediatrician
    • Other Contributors:
      • Stephanie Fulton Thomas L. Wilding Frances Groen

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the paper by Maayan-Metzger et al.[1]

    Unfortunately the term "fever" in the article is equated with "hyperthermia". They write:
    "fever... is related primarily to dehydration, breast feeding, infection.."
    Dehydration is one the common causes of hyperthermia, that is non-interleukin peripherily-mediated elevation of body temperatu...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Results after incorrect analysis: with whom does the responsibility lie?
    • Hassib Narchi, Consultant Paediatrician
    • Other Contributors:
      • United Kingdom

    Dear Editor

    In this interesting and very important study where each newborn with fever was compared to an afebrile neonate matched for gestational age and date of birth, the authors used a logistic model to test for risk factors associated with fever. Unfortunately, their results may not be valid as in matched case control studies, a conditional logistic model should have been used instead. The reviewers of the manusc...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.