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Neonatal long lines
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  • Published on:
    Neonatal long lines and the risk of pericardial effusion

    Dear Editor

    Whilst the leading article by Menon [1] provides an excellent overview of the use and complications of different types of neonatal venous lines. We must point out that in our retrospective study,[2] we demonstrated that pericardial effusions (PCE) were extremely rare with an incidence of 1.8/1000 (0.18%) lines inserted not 1.8%. as stated by Dr Menon.

    We agree with Menon1 and the Associate E...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Catheter material

    Dear Editor

    It is interesting to hear of the French experience of long lines reported by Bedu et al.[1]

    It is difficult to come to conclusions about real differences in incidence of pericardial effusion (PCE) with different catheter types with just one adverse event in each group in the AFSSPS survey.[2] The results of this survey may hide other factors, including type of unit (amount of experien...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Neonatal long lines and pericardial effusions: a differance between silicone and polyurethane?
    • Antoine Bedu, MD
    • Other Contributors:
      • Philippe Brosset, Valerie Belin, and Sophie Ketterer

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the articles of Menon and Beardsall et al.[1,2] especially as we recently experienced in a very low birth weight baby a pericardial effusion case related to a neonatal long line. This percutaneous long line was a polyurethane one and it was not surprising for us as the Agence Francaise de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (AFSSPS) (“French Agency for Health Products an...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Neonatal long lines- Are they safe?

    Dear Editor

    Neonatal long lines are essential part in the management of extremely low birth babies and very sick babies. Technically to insert a longline is not that difficult especially if attempted in the first few days but often we have to accept suboptimal positions. Definitely use of long lines have improved the outcome of babies weighing less than 1000grams and postoperative cases.

    More than safety we...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.