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Crying and breathing by new-born preterm infants after early or delayed cord clamping
  1. Madeleine C Murphy1,2,3,
  2. Lisa K McCarthy4,5,
  3. Colm Patrick Finbarr O’Donnell6,7
  1. 1 Neonatal Unit, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland
  2. 2 National Children’s Research Centre, Dublin, Ireland
  3. 3 School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  4. 4 Neonatal Unit, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
  5. 5 School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  6. 6 School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  7. 7 National Children’s Research Centre, Dublin, Ireland
  1. Correspondence to Prof Colm Patrick Finbarr O’Donnell, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, The National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland; codonnell{at}nmh.ie

Abstract

Guidelines recommend delayed cord clamping (DCC) of at least 30 s for vigorous preterm infants who do not require resuscitation. It is not known whether DCC affects the rate of crying and breathing after birth. We reviewed videos of 80 preterm infants in the delivery room. Most infants cried and breathed after both immediate and delayed cord clamping before respiratory support was given. Infants arrived at the resuscitaire in similar physiological condition, regardless of the time after birth at which they arrived.

  • infant
  • newborn
  • delayed cord clamping
  • crying
  • breathing
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Footnotes

  • Contributors MCM contributed to study concept, study design, data collection and analysis and writing of initial draft of the manuscript. LKMcC and CPFOD contributed to study concept, study design, supervision of the study and editing of final submission.

  • Funding Madeleine Murphy is supported by a Clinical Research Fellowship awarded by the National Children’s Research Centre (https://www.nationalchildrensresearchcentre.ie)

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval We have ethical approval to video-record infants in the delivery room with parental consent.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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