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Randomised cross-over study of automated oxygen control for preterm infants receiving nasal high flow
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  • Published on:
    Target range 90-95% vs. 91-95%
    • Katherine J Pettinger, ST6 Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS foundation trust
    • Other Contributors:
      • Sam Oddie, neonatologist

    We were impressed by the conduct and results of Reynolds et al.’s randomised controlled cross-over trial comparing Vapotherm’s IntellO2 device with manual control of inspired oxygen, showing improvement in the proportion of time spent within the target oxygen saturation range (automated arm mean 80% of time in 90-95% range vs. manual 49%). The findings are consistent with a meta-analysis referenced within their paper [1].

    The Neonatal Oxygenation Prospective Meta-analysis (NeOProM) shows that targeting oxygen saturations of 91–95% with an oximeter with a correctly configured algorithm, carries a 38% survival advantage [2]. The co-ordinator of the NeOProM collaboration has stated that the “Infants born extremely preterm … should have their oxygen saturation levels targeted between 91% and 95%” [3].

    The difference between the saturation targeting approach adopted by Reynolds et al., and NeOProM may appear small but, on account of the sigmoidal shape of the haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve, significant hypoxic shifts will occur with small changes in oxygen saturation.

    Given the rigor of the NeOProM findings, would Reynolds et al. agree that targeting oxygen saturations of 91-95% is an important first step, whilst we wait for products which will allow improved titration of oxygen delivery?

    References:
    [1] Mitra S, Singh B, El-Naggar W, McMillan DD. Automated versus manual control of inspired oxygen to target oxygen saturation in prete...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.