eLetters

644 e-Letters

  • Twin to twin transfusion syndrome.
    THHG Koh
    Dear Editor,

    The three excellent articles on twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) provide futher important data for clinical decisions and parental counselling. We would like to comment on the paper by Cincotta et al.[1]

    We are interested in the incidence of hydrops and absence of end diastolic velocity of the umbilical artery in the cohort and their correlation with outcome. A recent study of 33 pregn...

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  • Dexamethasone treatment and cerebral palsy
    POD Pharoah
    Dear Editor,

    Both the title of this paper and the first paragraph of the discussion imply that the use of postnatal dexamethasone may lead to cerebral palsy. However, it is the misuse of the term "incidence" that gives rise to this interpretation. The authors did not, neither could they, provide incidence data. What they presented was cerebral palsy prevalence data.

    If it is accepted that prevalence and no...

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  • Re: ROP could contribute to defects in eye-hand coordination
    Miriam Katz-Salamon

    Dear Editor:

    We are grateful for the response to our article on the neurodevelopment of infants with CLD. The comment as to the possible contribution of ROP to deficient eye-hand coordination is supported by the Swedish study published in British Journal of Ophthalmology (1991;75;527-31). The study clearly showed higher prevalence of ocular abnormalities in children with a birth weight below 1000 g and gesta...

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  • Premedication of neonates revisited
    Sanjay Gupta

    Dear Editor:

    A recent advance in premedicating infants requiring intubation has gained wide acceptance for humanitarian and physiological reasons.[1] The use of muscle relaxation to facilitate intubation is quite separate from sedation providing analgesia, amnesia and lack of awareness.

    Practice is variable with little evidence-based guidance to suitable drugs. Clinical Governance dictates continuing a...

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  • Reducing the burden of neonatal sepsis
    Khalid Haque

    Dear Editor:

    In their review on reducing the burden of neonatal sepsis[1] Modi and Carr discuss at length the role of colony stimulating factors (CSFs) in neonatal sepsis.

    The evidence thus far does not show either a reduction in incidence or mortality from neonatal sepsis when this modality is used albeit possibly in a small group of small for gestational age babies or babies who develop neutropenia s...

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  • ROP could contribute to defects in eye-hand coordination
    Rajalakshmi Lakshman
    Dear Editor:

    Katz-Salamon et al[1] make the important point that children with chronic lung disease (CLD) need careful neurodevelopmental follow up irrespective of whether or not they suffered from intraventricular haemmorhage or periventricular leucomalacia.

    Visual dysfunction due to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) could contribute to defects in control of hand and eye coordination.

    It would be in...

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  • Confirmed GBS infection - the tip of the iceberg
    AR Bedford Russell

    Dear Editor:

    Beardsall et al are to be congratulated on presenting further evidence that group B streptococcus (GBS) gives rise to a significant burden of disease in some areas of the United Kingdom.[1] Retrospective data collected at St George’s is in agreement with the authors’ suggestion that culture proven sepsis under-represents the true burden of disease.

    Firstly we conducted a retrospective search...

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  • GBS in breast milk with neonatal meningitis and serious consequences for pituitary function
    Anjum Deorukhkar

    Dear Editor:

    We read with interest the paper by Olver et al[1] describing triplets with group B streptococcal (GBS) infections acquired from breast milk. We have recently seen a case of GBS meningitis in a 34 week gestation infant and suspect that the source of infection was the maternal breast milk.

    At delivery there were no risk factors for sepsis. In particular, the baby was delivered by elective Caes...

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  • Risk of apnea and bradycardia following vaccination in premature infants.
    Heidi White

    Dear Editor:

    I refer to a comment made by Stalker[1] concerning the report by Slack & Schapira[2] of severe apneas and bradycardia following DTP and Hib vaccination in premature infants. No one would disagree that this association deserves to be fully investigated as soon as possible. Yet Stalker has said tha...

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  • Should we be proactive in reducing exposure of neonates to infected breast milk?
    J McAloon
    Dear Editor

    Reports of microbial contamination of expressed unpasturised breast milk (EBM)[1-3] are not new but the paper from Olver et al[4] again highlights that this routine aspect of neonatal care has the potential to provide a source for bacterial infection in immature neonates.

    Culture or pasturisation of a mother's own non-banked milk is not however routine practice in neonatal units in the UK and may even b...

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