eLetters

223 e-Letters

published between 2000 and 2003

  • Exposure of neonates to unnecessary pain is unethical
    Gregory J. Boyle, PhD (Melb & Delaware)

    Dear Editor

    Sahni and colleagues report that 15 neonates were given an unspecified non-invasive analgesic prior to circumcision,[1] which may have been EMLA cream. Test results recorded a significantly elevated heart rate (HR) and reduced oxygen saturation, indicative of pain.[1] The HR remained higher than baseline even after the conclusion of the surgery, suggesting ongoing pain from the tissue damage inflicte...

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  • Oxygen administration in infants: another option
    Subhash R Daga

    Dear Editor

    Frey and Shann have described different methods of administering oxygen with their pros and cons[1] : There is one more option available, although less-known and less tried, i.e., oropharyngeal administration of oxygen.[2] Head box oxygen is wasteful, hence uneconomical. Face mask is difficult to keep in place in children. Nasal prongs are expensive and are not available universally. Nasopharyngeal cathe...

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  • Digitally enhanced PACS Xray images are useful
    Vengudi S Sankar

    Dear Editor

    The authors of the recent case report[1] make an important point about the use of radio-opaque contrast to determine accurately, the position of the central line in neonates. This could perhaps be considered as ‘the gold standard’. There is however a real risk of line migration, the risk increasing with the time the line is left in. Thus, an appropriately positioned silastic line evaluated to be safe by ini...

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  • Gastric buffering and inter-subject variability remain problems for pH monitoring in neonates.
    Louise Grant

    Dear Editor

    We congratulate Omari and Davidson[1] on producing more interesting work on intragastric pH monitoring in preterm infants but feel that their results do not fully support their conclusion. This could have read "although the mid and distal stomach are quicker to re-acidify (time pH <4 58.7% and 55.7% respectively) than the proximal stomach (time pH<4 42.2%), these figures are still low". Perce...

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  • Long Lines in neonates and complications
    Mahesh Masand

    Dear Editor

    The authors need to be congratulated for publishing this case report which I think must have been the lesson of the week for many budding and trained neonatologists.

    I would just like to make few comments:
    1. The long line from the picture in the article appears to have been inserted via left ante cubital fossa rather than the right as mentioned in the text.

    ...

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  • The Chamberlen family (1560-1728) and obstetric forceps - correction
    John A Wintrip

    Dear Editor

    I refer to the article by Peter M Dunn.[1] This historical account makes an incorrect statement that "There is no record of Peter the elder ever marrying" (fourth paragraph). I would contest this statement, as a librarian and member of the Society of Genealogists, I have found ample documentary evidence that he married and had children.

    The 'Dictionary of National Biography' states: By his wife...

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  • Recent innovation in phototherapy
    Girish Gupta

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the article “Phototherapy with turquoise versus blue light” by F Ebbesen et al.[1]

    The article addresses to the usefulness of turquoise light and its relative advantage over conventional blue light in view of its equal efficacy in reducing serum bilirubin at a lesser irradiance and has stated the harmful mutagenic effects associated with blue light. However, we wou...

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  • Comments of Faerk et al.
    Samudra Mukherjee

    Dear Editor

    We read the article by Faerk et al.[1] on the relation of bone mineral content (BMC), ALP and serum phosphate; two commonly used markers for monitoring of metabolic bone diseases of prematurity (MBDP). In-fact, the author has tried to break the long-standing myth of regular monitoring of these two parameters for early detection and possibly prevention of this condition. However, we were disappoin...

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  • Neonatal thrombocytopenia: many dilemmas
    Ranjeet W Thergaonkar

    Dear Editor

    The review article on neonatal thrombocytopenia highlighted practical aspects in the management of a common yet often overlooked problem in neonatal practice. Three important factors were correctly highlighted by the authors – that thrombocytopenia exists in more than a fifth of the babies in any neonatal intensive care unit (and in a severe form in a sizeable minority), that it often is multifactorial...

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  • Dehydration: the main cause of fever during the first week of life
    Filiz Tiker

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the findings of Maayan-Metzger et al. relating fever in healthy newborns during the first days of life.[1]

    It is difficult to identify febrile neonates at low risk for serious bacterial infection.[2] Although, no consensus exists on the optimal approach to diagnosis and treatment, current guidelines recommend to admit all febrile infants less than 28 days of age to the...

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