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Spontaneous ping-pong parietal fracture in a newborn
  1. Mathilde Loire1,
  2. Maxime Barat2,
  3. Laurent Mangyanda Kinkembo3,
  4. Florence Lenhardt4,
  5. Célestin M'buila3
  1. 1Service de Pédiatrie, Groupe Hospitalier Carnelle Portes de l'Oise, Beaumont sur Oise, Île-de-France, France
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Groupe Hospitalier Carnelle Portes de l'Oise, Beaumont-sur-Oise, Île-de-France, France
  3. 3Department of Pediatrics, Groupe Hospitalier Carnelle Portes de l'Oise, Beaumont sur Oise, Île-de-France, France
  4. 4Department of Obstetrics, Groupe Hospitalier Carnelle Portes de l'Oise, Beaumont-sur-Oise, Île-de-France, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mathilde Loire, Service de Pédiatrie, Groupe Hospitalier Carnelle Portes de l'Oise, 25 Rue Edmond Turcq, Beaumont sur Oise, Île-de-France 95260, France; mathildeloire{at}orange.fr

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Clinical case

A female infant was delivered by caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation with a depressed calvarial fracture (DCF) (figures 1–3). No trauma was described during the pregnancy. No instrumental extraction was used during C-section. The newborn examination was normal.

Figure 1

Photography of the 1-day newborn skull that shows the parietal depression without haematoma.

Figure 2

Encephalic CT scan in the axial plane, brain filter, of the infant 24 hours after her birth. It shows the invagination of the parietal bone (arrow) …

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