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A gas-filled appendix on a plain X-ray of the abdomen in a preterm neonate
  1. V B Anna Venugopalan,
  2. C Keaney
  1. Birmingham City Hospital, Birmingham, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr V B Anna Venugopalan, Birmingham City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QH, UK; vikranthav{at}yahoo.com

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A 72-day-old preterm baby girl, born at 27 weeks' gestation, presented with abdominal distension, tachypnoea and desaturations. She was on 0.01 L/min of oxygen for her chronic lung disease (ventilated initially for 4 weeks and subsequently managed on continuous positive airway pressure and high-flow oxygen). She was receiving 200 mL/kg/day of mother's breast milk via a nasogastric tube. Her oxygen requirement had increased to 0.1 L/min and her abdomen was distended, tense with palpable bowel loops. Blood gas, inflammatory markers and haemoglobin (9.4 g/dl) were within the normal range. She was initially managed conservatively for necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) with nil by mouth and triple antibiotics. An abdominal X-ray …

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