Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Neonatal diabetes and insulin pump therapy
  1. Kathryn Beardsall1,
  2. Claire L Pesterfield2,
  3. Carlo L Acerini1
  1. 1Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK
  2. 2Department of Paediatrics, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Kathryn Beardsall, Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK, CB2 0QQ; kb274{at}cam.ac.uk

Abstract

The need for delivery of small doses of insulin, together with unpredictable feeding patterns and frequent changes in nutrient intake, makes the management of neonatal diabetes challenging. The availability of continuous glucose monitoring systems in combination with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps provides an opportunity to monitor glucose levels more closely and deliver insulin more safely. We report on a preterm infant with neonatal diabetes who had profound hypoglycaemia in response to bolus subcutaneous insulin therapy, but in whom we used the combination of continuous glucose monitoring and insulin pump therapy to manage glucose control in the neonatal period, and who was discharged home on pump therapy.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding University of Cambridge and Addenbrookes Hospital NHS Trust.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Parental consent obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.