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Retinopathy of prematurity in small-for-gestational age infants compared to appropriate-for-gestational age infants
  1. Catharine Ann Dhaliwal (cdhaliwa{at}staffmail.ed.ac.uk)
  1. University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    1. Brian W. Fleck (brian.fleck{at}luht.scot.nhs.uk)
    1. Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
      1. Elizabeth Wright (liz.w{at}cybase.co.uk)
      1. Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
        1. Catriona Graham (c.graham{at}ed.ac.uk)
        1. The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
          1. Neil McIntosh (nmc{at}staffmail.ed.ac.uk)
          1. Department of Child Life And Health, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

            Abstract

            Aim: To compare the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in small-for-gestational age (SGA) infants compared to appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) infants undergoing eye screening in the Lothian region of South East Scotland from 1990-2004.

            Methods: All infants in Lothian born with birth weight <1500grams and/or gestational age <32 weeks underwent eye screening by two experienced paediatric ophthalmologists (BF and EW). The presence of any stage of ROP (1-5), severe (stage 3 or greater) ROP and treated ROP was compared using Chi-square or Fishers Exact tests between the SGA and AGA infants. An infant was defined as being SGA if their birth weight was below the 10th percentile for gestational age.

            Results: A total of 1413 babies with birth weights <1500g and/or gestational age <32 weeks underwent eye screening. 329/1413 (23%) of the study population was SGA. SGA infants born at gestational ages 26-31 weeks were more likely to develop any stage of ROP (p<0.01) than their AGA peers. SGA infants were also more likely to develop severe ROP (GA 26-27wks p<0.01, GA 28-29wks p=0.01, GA 30-31wks p=0.01).

            Conclusions: SGA infants who underwent eye screening in the Lothian region of South East Scotland from 1990-2004 were significantly more likely to develop ROP and more severe disease than AGA infants.

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