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High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in newborns of high-risk mothers
  1. S.H. Dijkstra (shdijkstra{at}siekman.net)
  1. Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Netherlands
    1. A. van Beek
    1. Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Netherlands
      1. J.W. Janssen
      1. Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Netherlands
        1. L.H.M. de Vleeschouwer
        1. Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Netherlands
          1. W.A. Huysman
          1. Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Netherlands
            1. E.L.T. van den Akker (e.l.t.vandenakker{at}erasmusmc.nl)
            1. Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, Netherlands

              Abstract

              Objective: To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in newborn infants of mothers at risk of vitamin D deficiency because of dark skin or the wearing of concealing clothes (such as a veil), compared with a group supposed not to be at risk. A second aim was to correlate these newborns’ vitamin D concentrations to biochemical parameters of vitamin D metabolism and bone turnover at birth.

              Design: A prospective study conducted between April 2004 and February 2006 including women delivering in this period, and their newborns.

              Setting: Outpatient clinic of the obstetrics department, Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

              Patients: Eighty-seven newborns of healthy mothers either with dark skin and/or concealing clothing (risk group) or with light skin (control group).

              Results: We found a significant difference in the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D3 < 25 nmol/l) between newborns born to mothers at risk and newborns born to mothers in the control group (63.3% vs. 15.8%; p<0.0001). Mean alkaline phosphatase concentrations were significantly higher in the risk group.

              Conclusions: Newborn infants of mothers with dark skin or of mothers wearing concealing clothes are at great risk of vitamin D deficiency at birth. Clinical implications are unknown. Further research is necessary to determine the long-term consequences of maternal and neonatal vitamin D deficiency in order to issue guidelines on vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy.

              • deficiency
              • newborns
              • pregnancy
              • vitamin D

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                BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
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                BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health