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Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 98:A44 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2013-303966.150
  • Maternal Medicine Posters

PM.69 Haematinic Evaluation And Supplementation in a Normal Pregnancy

  1. K O’Donoghue1
  1. 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland
  2. 2Department of Haematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland

Abstract

Maternal and Neonatal complications have been described in antenatal iron, folate and B12 deficiencies.1 International recommendations have described the investigation and treatment of haematinic deficiencies.2

A prospective audit was conducted between January and April 2012. Postnatal patient charts were randomly sampled. Data was entered into a secure database. Haematinic levels were retrospectively acquired using institutional laboratory systems.

176 patients were included in our sample group, with a total of 757 investigations. 155 patients had more than 2 sets of haematological investigations during pregnancy. 39.7% had haematinic investigations performed. 48 patients had a ferritin level below 30 ug/L, of which 11 were using iron supplementation. 69.8% of patients reported folate supplementation, with 12.5% taking combined antenatal supplementation. 21% were taking a form of iron supplementation. Of the 28 people who were recorded as not taking antenatal supplementation, 6 had suboptimal ferritin levels.

Currently, there are no national guidelines on haematinic investigation in the antenatal population. This is imperative to improve patient outcomes. It is also essential to treat those who demonstrate clinical anaemia, and sub-optimal ferritin levels.

References

  1. Scholl, Hediger. Anemia and iron-deficiency anaemia: compilation of data on pregnancy outcome. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;59:492S-500S.

  2. Pavord, Myers, Robinson, Allard, Strong, Oppenheimer. UK guidelines on the management of iron deficiency in Pregnancy. British Committee for Standards in Haematology. July 2011.