Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 97:A119-A120 doi:10.1136/fetalneonatal-2012-301809.390
  • Abstract

Complications associated with delivery by caesarean section: is there a difference by body mass index?

  1. R Bell1,2
  1. 1Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  2. 2Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University/Regional Maternal Survey Office, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  3. 3Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Wansbeck General Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom


Introduction Evidence suggests that delivery by caesarean section in obese women (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30kg/m2) carries a higher risk of postoperative complications.

Aim This study tested the hypothesis that overweight (BMI 25-29.9kg/m2) and obese pregnant women have more post caesarean section complications than pregnant women of recommended BMI (18.5-24.9kg/m2) resulting in a longer length of stay in hospital.

Methods Using a piloted proforma, we undertook a case note review of a sample of women with a singleton pregnancy, aged ≥ 16 years and delivered by caesarean section in a district general hospital in 2008.

Results A total of 205 case notes were reviewed (27.9%) of all caesarean section deliveries in (DGH) in 2008. Overall, 86 (42.0%) women were of recommended BMI, 54 (26.3%) were overweight and 65 (31.7%) were obese. Thirty eight (58.5%) obese women stayed in hospital for ≥ 3 days compared to 27 (50%) overweight and 42 (49.4%) women of recommended BMI. However, none of these findings reached statistical significance. Fourteen (22.2%) obese women had a wound infection compared to five (9.3%) overweight and 17(20.2%) women of recommended BMI. Of these, 13 (92.2%) obese women received antibiotics for ≥7 days compared to three (75.0%) overweight and 11 (68.8%) women of recommended BMI.

Conclusion We did not find significant differences in postoperative complications and length of stay in hospital between overweight and obese pregnant women compared to women of recommended BMI.