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NNA: Nursing

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PN.01 THE EFFECT OF POSITIONING ON THE TRANSITION FROM TUBE TO ORAL FEEDING IN PRETERM INFANTS: A PILOT STUDY

K. Jones. Leeds Teaching Hospital Trust, Leeds, UK

Progress to full bottle feeding often determines timing of discharge. This small-scale randomised controlled trial tested the hypothesis that healthy, stable preterm infants fed in an elevated side-lying position progress to full oral feeds at the same rate as infants fed in the more traditional semi-upright position.

Eleven healthy preterm infants were randomly allocated to one of the two feeding positions and studied until full oral feeds were achieved. The mean total number of days to full oral feeds in those in the elevated side-lying position (range 14–27 days, mean 20.8 days) did not differ from those fed in the semi-upright position (range 10–33 days, mean 19 days, p>0.05). The rate at which the side-lying group achieved three, four or five feeds per day was, however, more rapid than the rate seen in the semi-upright group.

Side-lying was well accepted by both parents and nursing staff. This pilot study will inform the design of further necessary research to examine the potential benefits of this approach to an important and common problem.

PN.02 A DEVELOPMENT IN SCOTTISH QUALIFICATION AND CREDIT FRAMEWORK LEVEL 10 NEONATAL NURSING EDUCATION IN SCOTLAND: INNOVATION AND COLLABORATION

C. Greig1, S. L. Alexander2, M. Lobban1. 1Napier University, Edinburgh, UK, 2Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK

Two reports recommended a structured career pathway for neonatal nurses with appropriate educational provision in Scotland.1 2 An identified deficit in the provision of intermediate neonatal nursing education (SCQF level 10) was addressed by the NHS Education Board for Scotland tendering a project. Napier University and Glasgow Caledonian University in conjunction with Robert Gordon University, NHS Lothian, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and NHS Grampian were awarded the tender to deliver a suite of three modules.

These modules are: (1) A double integrated theory and practice module (40 level 10 credits)—Higher Level Knowledge and Skills for Neonatal Nursing. The module content focusses on the theoretical basis of specific systems, neonatal problems and conditions with opportunities to develop related practice in the neonatal intensive care setting. (2) A single module (20 level 10 credits)—Specialised Aspects of Neonatal Care, offering generic theory on subjects such as legal and ethical principles, leadership, research, working with parents and multidisciplinary team working. (3) A single module (20 level 10 credits)—Neonatal Resuscitation, Stabilisation and Transport will bring together standardised, neonatal-specific Continuing Professional Development education already available from local providers.

The ultimate aim of these modules would be to enable existing experienced neonatal nurses to achieve a Graduate Certificate in Neonatal Nursing Practice (60 level credits), which is a unique award in Scotland. These three modules are delivered across two sites at Napier University and Glasgow Caledonian University on a rotational programme.

PN.03 KANGAROO MOTHER CARE AND ITS EFFECTS ON PARENTING STRESS AND MATERNAL POSTNATAL ATTACHMENT IN CASES OF PREMATURE BIRTH

L. Genesoni1, R. L. Curran1, A. Huertas-Ceballos3, M. A. Tallandini. 1University College London Psychology Department, London, UK, 2University of Trieste Psychology Department, Trieste, Italy, 3Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Obstetric Hospital, UCLH, London, UK

This study investigates the impact of the kangaroo mother care (KMC) intervention for premature infants on mother–infant bonding.

Participants: 44 premature infants and their mothers were examined: 21 dyads in KMC and 23 in traditional care (TC).

Procedure: The KMC infants received daily skin-to-skin contact for a minimum of 1 h a day, for 14 days after birth. Maternal psychological data were collected twice: after delivery (time 1) and 2 weeks after the infant’s discharge (time 2). Tests administered were: Maternal Postnatal Attachment Questionnaire (MPAQ), Neonatal Perception Inventory (NPI), Parental Stress Index Short Form (PSI-SF), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Gordon-Personal Profile Inventory (GPP-I) (time 1 only).

Results: At time 1, some baseline characteristics between the intervention and the control group were significantly different with regard to gestational age at birth (more preterm in the KMC group), days in intensive care (more days in the KMC group) and mothers’ BDI score (higher in the TC group). All of these were considered as covariates in the statistical analysis. At time 2, KMC mothers were less rejective (MPAQ) towards their infants (F (1, 42) 9.56; p = 0.004) and less preoccupied (NPI) in caring for their infants (F (1, 42) 5.06; p = 0.031) than TC mothers. The parenting stress level changed between times 1 and 2: TC mothers only experienced a significant increase from time 1 (mean 42.77) to time 2 (49.27) (F (1, 22) 7.570; p<0.01).

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