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An unexpected cause of stridor in a newborn
  1. Oddvar Uleberg1,2,
  2. Bjørn Myklebust3,
  3. Jana Rydland4,
  4. Ragnhild Støen5,6
  1. 1 Department of Emergency Medicine and Pre-hospital Services, St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  2. 2 Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway
  3. 3 Department of Paediatrics, Levanger County Hospital, Levanger, Norway
  4. 4 Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  5. 5 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway
  6. 6 Department of Paediatrics, St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Dr Oddvar Uleberg, Department of Emergency medicine and Pre-hospital services, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway, St. Olav's University Hospital/AHL, Prinsesse Kristinas gate, Trondheim N-7006, Norway; oddvar.uleberg{at}stolav.no

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Case report

A non-dysmorphic term boy presented with inspiratory stridor shortly following delivery. Following clinical examination and thoracic x-ray, no external features or other clinical findings revealed any obvious explanation. Laryngomalacia was suspected. A combined rhinopharyngo—oropharyngo—and laryngoscopy revealed a cystic mass stretching from nasopharynx, to oropharynx and distally beyond the postcricoid structures, filling out 2/3 of the oropharyngeal space. The neck mass increased in size and became externally …

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