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Umbilical blood flow patterns directly after birth before delayed cord clamping
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  • Published on:
    Physiology of umbilical blood flow with uetrotonics?; in reply
    • Arjan te Pas, neonatologist Leiden University Medical Centre

    Thank you for your interest in our study and your comment. When you read the 6th paragraph of the discussion of the article, you will find that we completely agree that Oxytocin could have influenced the observations. This was an observational study and moment of oxytocin was given to the discretion of the midwife. Nevertheless, we still observed umbilical circulation much longer than previously described. This study was performed in 2015, but our local guideline has recently been changed to administering oxytocin after cord clamping. A new study is currently undertaken using the same methodology.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Physiology of umbilical blood flow with uetrotonics?
    • Christiane Schwarz, midwife MPH PhD, lecturer Innsbruck fhg University of Applied Sciences

    Thank you for this interesting and highly needed piece of knowledge on physiological umbilical bllod flow. Just one remark: uterotonics were given to all women directly after birth. Oxytocin may alter umbilical blood flow due to modifications in timing and strength of contractions, and influence timing of placental disattachment. Possibly, true physiological blood flow may be still different (and continue for even longer), if medication were administered after clamping (quite possibly with no significant disadvantage for the parturient).

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.